• Dzama

The Feast

They enjoyed a candle-lit dinner on a large oak table loaded with exquisite delicacies- glazed ducks on huge silver trays, salmon, mountains of beautifully carved vegetables, salads, a castle shaped out of mashed potatoes dripping with gravy. At least fifty candles flickered on the table, all in polished silver candle-holders, and the yellow candle-light glinted off all the gleaming silver and illuminated the sumptuous entrees. A pig head blindly held an apple in its glistening mouth, cubes of tofu dripped with an exotic sesame wine sauce. One platter contained four types of octopus, each a different color. Trent raised his glass to toast his new bride, Marbie. She grinned and raised her glass, her delicate hand trembling slightly. “Here’s to a life of feasting together!” Trent pronounced.

“Here, here,” the girl cried. Their crystal glasses clinked melodically and they drank deeply, staring into each other’s eyes. As soon as their glassed hit the table, the feast began, with each of them tearing into the food with abandon. Sauces dripped down Marbie’s chin and glazed Trent’s beard. In their feeding frenzy, plates were knocked on the floor and drinks spilled. The dogs below profited from their losses and growling could be heard from under the table as the animals fought over scraps.

Soon Marbie and Trent were on the table on all fours themselves, crawling around and ripping and crunching the food like the dogs beneath.

The butler arrived, announcing a call for Mr. Trent but found it very hard to get their attention. When he did, he immediately wished he hadn’t, for, blinded in their frenzy, they set upon him, knocking him to the floor and tearing the flesh from his bones. They were joined by the dogs and the feast continued until the sun rose and all that was left was bones, dirty silver, a dripping oak table, and Marbie. The young girl hadn’t even stopped eating until her new groom and his dogs had also been reduced to bones. She sat now in the gory mess breaking one of the bones open to eat the marrow, her once-white gown smeared with tartar sauce and blood.

Copyright © 2008. All Rights Reserved.

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